Keeping your child safe from accidental poisoning

Keeping your child safe from accidental poisoning

By Jeffrey Snedeker, MD

A momentary distraction from watching a child is all it takes for a youngster to become a victim of an accidental poisoning.

Data from the U.S. Poison Control Centers show youngsters six-years-old and younger account for just under half of all accidental poisoning each year. Toddlers that are age three and younger have the highest risk for poisoning of all children. Cosmetics, cleaning materials, pain medications and personal care products lead the list of the most common substances involved in pediatric accidental poisoning.

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Tips for Preventing Childhood Obesity

By Audrey DeSilva, MD

The prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity has doubled in the past two decades, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nearly 16 percent of children and adolescents in the United States are now overweight. Equally alarming is the trend for overweight children to grow into overweight and obese adults. In a call to action in 2001, the Office of the Surgeon General predicted that preventable chronic illness and premature death from complications associated with obesity might surpass even those health problems associated with cigarette smoking.

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The Impact of Childhood Asthma

by Christopher Smith, MD

Asthma has traditionally been described as a reversible obstructive airway disease. The assumption was that after each asthma attack, the lungs returned to normal. Asthma experts now know, however, that if asthma sufferers fail to treat effectively the chronic airway inflammation that characterizes asthma, they will begin to develop scar tissue in their lungs. In the course of a year, a person with severe asthma can lose up to one percent of his or her lung function. It doesn’t sound like much until you consider that over several decades, you could permanently lose a significant amount of your lung function. This is called airway remodeling.

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Sports-Related Injuries in Children

By Andrew Getzin, MD

Over the past few decades, there has been an increase in the amount of sports training in which young children participate. They are playing quantities that approach those of older athletes. In addition, many children are specializing in one sport on year-round traveling teams. As a result, children are developing more injuries and at an earlier age.

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Meningococcal Disease: Deadly Dangerous

By William Klepack, MD

Meningococcal meningitis is one of those diseases that give physicians nightmares. This potentially fatal bacterial infection starts out with symptoms similar to those of the flu. Within a matter of hours, however, this disease can cause inflammation of the brain and spinal cord and widespread infection throughout the body. Even with the advantage of modern medicine and powerful antibiotics, meningococcal (bacterial) meningitis has a high fatality rate: in this country, five to fifteen percent of those who contract it will die from it, even with medical treatment.

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Keeping Children Safe During the Holidays

By Audrey DeSilva, MD

For most people the holiday season is a time of celebration and reunion with family and friends. We look forward to being together, especially when there is a new addition to the family. However, for young children, the holidays can be a high-risk time of year.

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Helping Children with Facial Deformities

By Jeffrey Lewis, MD, DMD

Cleft palate is a very common birth defect in the United States, effecting one in every 800 births. Three to five babies are born every year at Cayuga Medical Center with cleft lip, cleft palate, and other facial deformities. Additional babies and children come to Tompkins County from the surrounding region for services, and a number of children with facial deformities move here each year with their families.

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Childhood Fever: Friend or Foe?

by Jeffrey Snedeker, MD

Fever is one of the most common reasons parents call the doctor or take their children in for an office visit. They are concerned about getting the fever down as quickly as possible, especially if it seems high.

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Cleft Palate and Facial Deformities Team Provide Family Support

By Jeffrey Lewis, MD, DMD

Cleft lip and palate are common birth defects, occurring in about 1 in 800 births in the U.S. Each year, on average, three to five babies with cleft lip, cleft palate, or both are delivered at Cayuga Medical Center. An estimated five or six more babies are born elsewhere in the region and another handful of young children with cleft abnormalities move to Tompkins County with their families.

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About Cayuga Medical Center

We are a not-for-profit, acute-care medical center bringing state-of-the-art diagnostic and treatment services to the residents of Tompkins, Cortland, Seneca, and Tioga counties. And a century after our founding, we remain intrinsically tied to those we serve: our corporate membership includes representatives from over 100 community organizations. At Cayuga Medical Center, we believe that hospitals are shaped by the people they serve

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